In Linux

Those of you who play games online, enjoy playing in groups or teams will know how useful VOIP is.
Back in the day, our original setup goes something like this — Whoever had the faster, more capable system run Battlecom or Teamspeak application server but this meant your players need to be local too otherwise there’d be so much lag, it can make game play unbearable. 🙄

For a while, I have always wanted my own public accessible VOIP communication platform for my own co-op gaming needs, they’re usually useful in guilds too. A place where we can chill, speak freely without worrying about someone listening in.

However searching around online you can easily rent Teamspeak servers with X number of slots, however they normally charge by the month, some companies want you to subscribe for a twelve month term. Also, should one day you need more slots, you’ll need to rent the next tier up, all of this adds additional costs to your monthly out goings but obtaining the software from Teamspeak is completely free, so why pay someone to host for you?

I figured.. Why are we running one as an application when it’s possible to host one on a web-server?

There are certain advantages of hosting your own server, most of them are privacy concerns and the ability to delegating rights to whom is able to use the facility. You don’t want to be swamped by loads of random folks, taking up all the slots, do you? So a few months back I went about learning to setup my very own TS3 server, making it publicly accessible so guildies and team-mates can find us. Here’s the steps I took to setup my own basic server.

In-order to accomplish this, assuming your running Windows (who games on a Mac anyway?) You’ll need to download and use PuTTY as a SHH/Telnet client and the server root logins. Download which ever version you’d prefer, personally I just used the regular x86 version. It’s not an installer, just runs “as administrator.”

To avoid typing in the root password blind, I suggest you create a shortcut to the application and edit the properties. Replace the paths accordingly.

ts3-putty-shortcut

Firstly, you need to create a separate account for the application to live on, this effective prevents accidental deletion. To create a new user account, do this:

To install Teamspeak server, download the appropriate version that suits your OS, your options are 32bit or 64bit. Our server is running 64bit code. If your not sure which to run, then it’s safer to go with their 32bit version.

Now you need to install the appropriate software for your installation. Choose one.

64-Bit installation

Time to change to the installed directory and start the server

32-Bit installation

Time to change to the installed directory and start the server

This will download, extract, install, and run teamspeak 3 server version 3.0.11.3.

Once your server starts up you will see it output something like this. Be sure to write your Server Query Admin Account down as it will not be shown again. An easy way to copy it would be to select it all and copy it to a text file.

------------------------------------------------------------------
                      I M P O R T A N T
------------------------------------------------------------------
              Server Query Admin Acccount created
         loginname= "serveradmin", password= "ke1C0M3n"
------------------------------------------------------------------


------------------------------------------------------------------
                      I M P O R T A N T
------------------------------------------------------------------
      ServerAdmin privilege key created, please use it to gain
      serveradmin rights for your virtualserver. please
      also check the doc/privilegekey_guide.txt for details.

       token=nartD+49297z62oY0989m3G0Z02d66c3C9p063QT

------------------------------------------------------------------

CentOS

If you want to have teamspeak start-up automatically after a server restart you should add a cron job. To add the cron job run the following commands. Also make sure you’re logged into the “ts3srv” account and not root!

If you haven’t used VI editor before this might be a bit tricky.

This will allow you to add text into the cronjob file. In the bottom left corner it should say (– INSERT –)

When it says that write this in window.

32-bit
64-bit

ts3-npl
You can apply for a non-profit license (NPL) that will give you rights to setup two servers, each with 512 slots. You’ll need to give them your personal details (name, address, phone number & domain) in-order to obtain this license. The NPL takes around 24-48 hours to process. But, be warned. You can not sell/rent the server(s) to other people for profit and you can not have donation buttons on the domain either! Even if it’s to help maintain the hosting. It’s not allowed.

This version of the installer doesn’t require a separate database. All your settings are stored as configs files within the application folder. I feel it’s cleaner, easier to uninstall at a later date.. Just delete the user and your done. There is an alternative install methods which require a dedicated MySQL database.

Recent Posts
Contact Us

We're not around right now. But you can send us an email and we'll get back to you, asap.

Not readable? Change text. captcha txt